Some answers lie just beneath the surface…

Readings with James Orzano at One Roof are a guided exploration into self-awareness and self-discovery. Each reading is a unique experience that can reveal the deeper inner meanings behind issues that are presenting themselves on a mental, physical, and spiritual level.

Each Reading begins with a discussion about the client’s issues and a clarification of the intention for the Reading. Then a spread is created using the Osho Tarot Cards. This layout serves as a portal into the client’s energy field and provides James with a template for gaining insights that can identify hidden clues, which can help them “connect the dots” about difficult challenges they are facing. Since the client selects their own cards, the layout is a direct reflection of what they have been unable or unwilling to recognize or accept.

James provides a guided interpretation of the Reading and generates a clear picture of the client’s present situation, with suggestions about how to move through the obstacles that have been standing in the way of growth and change. The emphasis of the Reading is not on prophecy or divination. Instead, the Readings focus on the “here and now” and encourage the client to embrace their potential for transformation and empowerment to shape their future by accepting the need for change.

With over 20 years of experience offering Readings, James is able to create a safe space for clients to fully immerse themselves in the energy of the Reading experience. He is an empath who is a compassionate and gifted intuitive channel. With a no-nonsense commitment to truth, James brings humor and wisdom to the deep and introspective realms of personal growth.

One Roof welcomes new practitioner!

One Roof welcomes psychotherapist Stephanie Armer (LCSW). Stephanie is currently accepting new patients at our 58 Henry St. offices. Stephanie has been in the social work field for over 13 years. She provides a structured and safe environment in which clients feel comfortable identifying goals and working towards a more positive and fulfilling life experience. She collaborates with clients to identify and build on their preexisting strengths, develop and utilize coping mechanisms, and increase mindfulness. Stephanie strives to enable clients to embrace and cultivate these strengths utilizing strength-based therapies, while creating a treatment approach that meets the individual needs of the client or family.

She uses a dynamic approach in her work, using a combination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), along with strength-based techniques. Stephanie works with adolescents, adults, couples and families to provide support in a therapeutic setting. She has particular interest and experience in working with adolescents and adults struggling with depression, anxiety, self-esteem issues, family conflict, and trauma. Visit our Practitioners’ Page for complete contact info.

Reflect and Refresh, by Pierre Zimmerman.

We call ourselves human beings, but we might as well say we are human doings. Most of our time is spent in work projects, relationship management, and related details. Reflection allows us to explore and discern which thoughts and actions will contribute to the services that make any system flourish. Reflection provides a platform to redirect the focus needed for interventions to turn things around for the well being of the individuals and the company with which they are associated.

Pierre Zimmerman Director One Big RoofMeditation, a focus on emotional intelligence and mindful practices in the workplace, can create more balance between doing and being. Reflective awareness maintains integrity, commitment and alignment with the goals of the organization. Social competencies determine how we manage relationships, leverage diversity, influence and build a web of relationships, become change catalysts and enhance cooperation and team building.

About fifteen years ago as the executive director of a specialty hospital, I would invite staff to honor a minute of silence before starting meetings. At first people reacted to having their mental models challenged, but over time people were able to re-set their breath in a natural rhythm and their bodies and minds into a state of regulated functioning: calm abiding. It gave them time to reflect, to bring awareness to their emotions and figure out how to proceed with the agenda items in a manner that provided more stability, flexibility, curiosity and coherence. Meetings became attractive and rewarding!

Reflection is important for understanding ourselves and others. It enhances efficiency and because of this, outcomes are more productive. Victor Frankl, who survived many atrocities in concentration camps, was once asked how he was able to integrate all he witnessed. This was his response: “Between every stimuli and response there is a pause and in that pause lies freedom.” The pause is the refresh. We even have a bio-pause between every in-breath and out-breath. Frankl figured out in the midst of exceptionally extreme conditions and an unsafe environment how to resource himself.

We all need, in our daily busy lives, to call on ways that allow us to recharge our batteries and observe the world from a different perspective. These can include reflection, physical exercise, playtime, hobbies, artistic endeavors and volunteer activities. It is paused time that allows us to move beyond ourselves and embrace passionate activities for not only ourselves, but also everyone’s benefit around us.

Kids are given a “time out” when they cannot stop unwholesome behavior or don’t know when to rest or move on to the next moment. We as adults need to choose and determine a “down time” to replenish ourselves and become more resilient. Self-care keeps us healthy and activates loving kindness for ourselves and non-referential compassion for others.

PIERRE ZIMMERMAN IS DIRECTOR OF ONE BIG ROOF AND AN INSTRUCTOR WITH THE SARATOGA STRESS REDUCTION PROGRAM. This essay recently appeared in the Saratoga Chamber of Commerce “Workplace Wellness Guide.”

Back to School?

Back to School: Yippee – Oh No
Simple Ways That Mindfulness Can Help,
by Maura FoxMauraFox2016

The air is changing and the days are getting shorter. We all know what that means. It’s time to go back to school. Maybe your child is going to pre-school, kindergarten, college or anywhere in between, and your emotions can shift all over the map. On one hand, you may be excited that you can get back to a routine–the big calendar showing where everyone is to be and when. On the other hand, it can be overwhelming and exhausting. The first few days are often filled with endless forms that need to be completed with the same information from the last 5 years, signing permissions for internet and photo releases and then the endless list of supplies, “No, it has to be a RED NOTEBOOK, the teacher said so.” How about the not so obvious emotions: fear, helplessness, loneliness, worry? We send our children off with the hope that they will be cared for and nurtured throughout their day.

I remember putting my daughter on the bus on the first day of 5th grade, the last year of elementary school. No big deal, I went to work. On the way the song Runaway Train, by Soul Asylum was playing and I started to cry. The only thing I heard was “runaway train never going back…” There she was, my little 5th grader, her last year in elementary school, next year its off to middle school then high school, college, marriage, children. We laugh about it now, but at the time I did not know about mindfulness and living in the present moment non-judgmentally. I had her all grown up and leaving me for good. Notice that– leaving “me.” It was all about me back then, but that’s a story for another time.

Jon-Kabat Zinn, Professor of Medicine and creator of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction and the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, defines mindfulness as “the awareness that emerges through paying attention on purpose, in the present moment and nonjudgmentally to the unfolding of experience moment by moment”. Mindfulness is a practice that allows us to let go of worry and release ourselves from judgment. It is an in-the-moment awareness and acceptance of thoughts and feelings.

Mindfulness is good for us. It allows us to be present in our parenting, choosing our response instead of having a knee-jerk reaction. We all want the same thing for our children, to be happy, healthy and successful in everything they do. As another school year begins here are some things you can try to create calmness in your life and help you connect to your children.

-Self-Compassion: Identify and acknowledge any feelings/emotions that arise without judgment.
-Recognize that things are temporary.
-Focus on your breath. Stop, take a breath, observe and then proceed. Taking this short pause, even for 10 seconds, is the best tool for calming the body and allowing us space to choose how we respond in any given situation.
-Breathing Buddy: Have your child use their favorite stuffed toy. Have your child lie down on their back and place the breathing buddy on their belly.  The breathing buddy will rise and fall with with each breath. You can count to three on the inhale and back down on the exhale to encourage slow breathing.
-Be present. The most important thing our children want from us is our attention. Put down the cell phone, turn off the TV, stop what you are doing, and just be with your child. Listen to what your child has to say with your undivided attention.

Above all, remember that we do the best we can each day with the knowledge that we have. The focus of mindfulness is to bring awareness to aspects of our daily lives so we can make decisions that minimize stress and create greater balance in our lives and the lives of our children. It takes courage, effort and patience but by developing a mindfulness practice we can continue to grow along with our children.

Maura Fox has been in the field of education for over 30 years. She has experience with students on the autism spectrum, emotional/behavioral, ADHD and executive function disorders as well as language/learning/ reading disabilities. As a Certified Mindfulness Educator, she has taught mindfulness to school students K-12, and educators, parents and adults wanting to learn a different way of being. See her November 17th One big roof workshop on our cAlendar.

The Four Immeasurables

From the Desk of Pierre Zimmerman, MS
THE FOUR IMMEASURABLES OR GATELESS GATES

Bee-image

I wanted to share with you four intentions that are part of lay Buddhist practice to better be connected with others and share our deepest humanity. During the summer we tend to gather and visit friends, families and acquaintances and these intentions always come in handy in small or large groups.
Loving kindness is love with no strings attached or any particular agenda, just the pure, innocent wish for others and oneself to be content.
Compassion is the highest spiritual ideal of wishing other sentient beings to be free from suffering. The Tibetan word for compassion means “king of hearts.”
Sympathetic joy is experiencing happiness for someone else’s contentment, well being, successes and good fortune.
Equanimity is staying calm and centered, no matter what life throws at us; pleasure and pain, success and failure, praise and blame, fame and disrepute. It lets us relate in a deep way with friends, relatives and strangers.
Each of the four immeasurable has an opposite:
For loving kindness it is ill will or harmful intent,
For compassion it is cruelty,
For sympathetic joy it is envy or jealousy, and
For equanimity it is greed, aversion, prejudice.
Setting these four intentions sustains our energy and purpose to live in alignment with our best aspirations and wishes for ourselves and others. May it be so!
PIERRE ZIMMERMAN IS DIRECTOR OF ONE BIG ROOF AND AN INSTRUCTOR WITH THE SARATOGA STRESS REDUCTION PROGRAM.

Hiroshima Day 71st Commemoration Ceremony

Grafton Peace Pagoda Saturday August 6, 2016

Hiroshima Day
71st Commemoration Ceremony

Everyone is welcome to commit to peace and never again using weapons of mass destruction. Let us come together to create world peace one step at a time. Let us find ways to heal the earth and all beings. We must have no enemies and become the enemy of none.

6:30 PM walk from Grafton Town Square to Peace Pagoda (4.3 miles) Pagoda Pagoda2016HiroshimaDay
8:00 PM Program of Peace

– Ceremonial Lighting of Lanterns
– Interfaith Prayers for Peace
– Musical Offerings
– Speakers/Readings
– Fire Hoop Dance

Rain or shine. Please wear weather-appropriate clothes and bring a flashlight and insect repellant. You may also want a blanket.

Please contact the Peace Pagoda to participate: For more information please call the Grafton Peace Pagoda between 7:30 AM and 4:30 PM (518) 658-9301

 

Documentary Trilogy

pathbgPath Documentary Trilogy

This documentary trilogy will educate viewers, shed light on topics of consciousness exploration and investigate the many theories of the soul’s purpose. Our films cover subjects of consciousness, out of body exploration, paranormal encounters, holistic healing, physics and metaphysics. The Path trilogy will introduce metaphysical concepts to the mainstream audience with hard scientific and experiential evidence from our expert panel. The intention behind the films of Path11 Productions is to continue to challenge people to question their beliefs, to raise the vibrational level of consciousness on a large scale and spread the message to as many people as possible that we are all one, we are consciousness. The DVD series will be targeted to the mainstream American audience in order to educate people to consider alternative practices to achieve optimal health, an opportunity to raise their level of consciousness and to implement new ideas of living in this physical world for an overall higher quality of life. Produced by April Hannah and Directed by Michael Habernig.

For more information visit http://www.hannahshealing.com/the-path/

There will be a film screening of “The Path: Evolution” at Saratoga Arts on Tues July 12th at 7pm. Contact them for more information at 518-584-4132.

Empathy, Compassion and Altruism

By Pierre Zimmerman

The word empathy is a translation from the German word Einfuhlung, which refers to “the ability to feel the other from within.” Empathy can be set off by an affective perception of feeling for a person with whom we enter into resonance or by cognitive imagination evoked by the other person’s experience. Emotional resonance usually precedes cognitive resonance and depends on the intensity of our emotions as to whether we can really respond or become reactive instead.

heartTrue empathic concern consists of becoming aware of another’s needs and then feeling a sincere desire to come to his or her aid. It doesn’t involve pity, which is egocentric or condescending, or for that matter emotional contagion, which results in distress or empathy fatigue because we confuse our feelings with that of the other.

Compassion is the capacity to use our heart to relieve the suffering of another and all the possibilities to accomplish this. It includes the realization that ignorance is the fundamental cause of suffering and gives rise to an array of mental obscurations, lack of love, meaning, confidence and absence of a clear compass. Motivation for taking actions for release of suffering counts more than their outcome or results. Compassion doesn’t exclude anything possible to prevent the other from continuing to harm or break the circle of hatred.

Altruism is the motivational state that has the ultimate goal of increasing another’s welfare. It is a willingness to lead a life devoted to the well being of others without the need of ulterior motive. Valuing others and being concerned about their situation are essential. Buddhism defines it as the wish that all beings find happiness and the causes of happiness. In this context, happiness is not just a temporary state of well being, but a way of being that includes, wisdom, inner freedom and strength, as well as an accurate view of reality.

Altruistic love and compassion add joy when perceiving the happiness and good qualities of others as well as impartiality. Rejoicing means that we don’t want others’ qualities and happiness to diminish, but instead to increase and persist. This serves as an antidote to competitiveness, jealousy and envy and is a remedy for depression or despairing views. Impartiality or equanimity doesn’t depend either on our personal attachments or the way others behave towards us. Altruistic love requires courage; fear and insecurity are major obstacles to altruism. We need to develop an inner strength that makes us confident in our inner resources, which help us face the constantly changing circumstances of our lives.

Pierre Zimmerman is Director of One Big Roof and an instructor with the Saratoga Stress Reduction Program.

Grafton Peace Pagoda Flower Festival, 6/12

Grafton Peace Pagoda Flower Festival
Celebrating the Birth of the Buddha
Sunday June 12, 2016 at 11:00AM

-Traditional Buddhist Ceremony
-Ecumenical Prayers
-Speakers
-Music
-Pot Luck Community Lunch

flowerNipponzan Myohoji, Grafton Peace Pagoda
87 Crandall Rd, Petersburgh, NY 12138

For information or to help with ceremony preparation
Please call (518) 658-9301 between 8am and 5pm

FLYER attached below for download.

Flower Festival FLYER 2016

Lunchtime Life Line…

Janet Orzano Reiki Master and Teacher One Roof SaratogaSpecial Offer: Pressed for time? Try this Lunchtime* Life Line: 1/2-hour Reiki sessions with Janet Orzano for $45. You will go directly to the Reiki table and choose to receive Reiki on the front or back of your body. Reiki comes from the Japanese word (Rei) which means “Universal Life” and (Ki) which means “Energy”. And a Reiki session can help ease tension and stress and support the body to facilitate an environment for healing on all levels – physical, mental, and emotional. A great way to recharge for office or family! (*This special is available anytime of day, not just at lunchtime!) Contact Janet today at 581-3180 ext 313.